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> 490 Line Voltage Tolerances
(Unkie) Reamus
post Nov 30 2010, 11:32 PM
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I've had a 490 for about 6 months now that I use to tune steel pans (A MAJOR upgrade for me, since I had been doing it with a keyboard, my ear and a pseudo-needle digi tuner before...so in other words, by guess and by golly.) I love it right to death.

For the first about 5 months, I was bringing the pans home from the school they're located at to tune, but between the time and effort involved in that and the fact that the transportation knocks them out of tune, I've recently switched to doing it at the school. This is unfortunate, because my home has a whole house UPS which serves to mitigate the...less than reliable power we get here in Honduras, which the school does not.

I'd been getting away with it until today, when I had a minor heart attack after the display stopped responding to button presses, and when I power cycled the tuner, the wheel didn't spin. After poking around here on the forums for a while, I figured it was probably just a low line voltage, plugged the tuner in here at home and presto, it worked and passed it's self-tests...whew. (Though I'm uncertain about the software freeze, could this potentially be a different issue entirely?)

The question I have though, is that how tolerant are these tuners for voltage fluctuations? Can I reliably expect the fuse to blow before anything else does for spikes, and (while I consider it unlikely), is it possible that brownout could cause damage?

If I have to, I'll buy a UPS for it (Having blown a couple of AVRs, I don't trust them much, but UPSes have always proved reliable), but I'd rather deal with blown fuses and lost time due to brownouts than spend the money (since the work is all for free)...however I'd much rather pay the money for a UPS than pay the money for a new AS (or even repair)...

Which brings up my final question, how well will the 490 handle a modified sine? I'm guessing not terribly well, but it would be awesome if it would. (My home system provides something very close to true sine which it seems to be happy with, but again, if I could avoid paying more for the UPS if I have to buy one, I'd be happier.)

Thank you
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Sue
post Dec 2 2010, 03:17 PM
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QUOTE ((Unkie) Reamus @ Dec 1 2010, 06:32 AM) *
The question I have though, is that how tolerant are these tuners for voltage fluctuations? Can I reliably expect the fuse to blow before anything else does for spikes, and (while I consider it unlikely), is it possible that brownout could cause damage?

If I have to, I'll buy a UPS for it (Having blown a couple of AVRs, I don't trust them much, but UPSes have always proved reliable), but I'd rather deal with blown fuses and lost time due to brownouts than spend the money (since the work is all for free)...however I'd much rather pay the money for a UPS than pay the money for a new AS (or even repair)...

Which brings up my final question, how well will the 490 handle a modified sine? I'm guessing not terribly well, but it would be awesome if it would. (My home system provides something very close to true sine which it seems to be happy with, but again, if I could avoid paying more for the UPS if I have to buy one, I'd be happier.)

Thank you


Hi Reamus,

If you are living in a part of the world that has power issues I would definitely use the UPS to regulate the voltage. As close to a true sine as you can get. Brown out conditions will not cause any lasting problems. The fuse will protect the circuit against most over voltage situations. Of course, if it gets 220 vac while set for 120 vac, there might be a problem,. wink.gif
But nothing that can't be fixed biggrin.gif
Best regards
Sue Haslam
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Andy J.
post Dec 18 2010, 07:00 PM
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Touching the topic,

I am a touring guitar tech who recently got myself a 490. The voltage selection in it is 120 for 110-130V, 220 for 210-230V, 240 for 230-250V.

In Europe, the standard was 220V. After the EU voltage harmonization, many places that gave 220V now are listed as 230V. This causes a bit of diversity in European voltages. For example, in Scandinavia and Central Europe it is common to get steady 235V, whereas in Eastern Europe the voltage lingers around 225V.

For the voltages topping 230V (but below 240V) should one switch to the 240 mode?
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John Norris
post Dec 20 2010, 06:09 PM
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Hi Andy,
QUOTE (Andy J. @ Dec 19 2010, 01:00 AM) *
For the voltages topping 230V (but below 240V) should one switch to the 240 mode?


Slight overvoltage is better than undervoltage, so leave it at 220V when not in a 120V or 100V country, my own experience as a touring tech (retired now wink.gif ) is that AC voltages consistently at or over 240VAC are very seldom anywhere (especially at gigs).

John N.
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