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> StroboStomp2 for setting Intonation
roadhog96
post Jan 18 2008, 07:19 PM
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I tried setting the intonation on my guitar today with the StroboStomp2. The guitar was set up with a digital tuner. According to the Strob it was way off. I tried to tune two notes an octave apart as the direction suggest, but it seems that one note will be in tune, an one in the other octave is way off either sharp or flat. I don't see how this can be obtained. So I ended up tuning using the equal temperament and fretting the note at the 12th and checking it with the harmonic. It seems ok but when I tune using one of the guitar sweetners and then check the intonation, it's telling me it's way off. Is this right?
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mike skubic
post Jan 21 2008, 08:37 AM
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It's a little confusing following exactly what you've done here, but let me see if I can explain what I think you're seeing. Since Sweeteners™ really do alter the "no roll" frequency of individual notes compared to "standard" equal, it's quite possible to see some of the effects you're describing even with a well-intonated guitar. But on top of that, I still suspect your intonation setup with another tuner is not what it should be.
I would suggest intonating again using the Stomp straight up: no offsets and at EQUal temperament setting. Then tune open with EQU using the Stomp as well and double check for consistency. Assuming everything holds at that point, you could start experimenting with different Sweeteners for open strings. (The intonation should not have to be readjusted to accommodate Sweeteners used on open string tuning.)
Hope that helps.
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roadhog96
post Jan 21 2008, 08:54 PM
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Mike, I tried setting the intonation using equal temperament setting only I could never get the same note, on the same string, on two different frets an octave apart in tune. One would be in tune but the other would be way off. After several attempts I decided to set the intonation by freting the strings at the 12th fret and checking them with the harmonic note and they seem to be right on. This was all done using equal temperament tunning. What I was getting at is that if you were to check the intonation on any of the sweatner tunning choices it would say that the intonation was off, but I guess that doesn't matter as long as it's set by the equal temperament, it will be correct. How do you suggest on setting the intonation so that two notes an octave apart will be in tune, get them as close as possible by splitting the difference between the two notes and would this method be more accurate than the 12th fret method.
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gomuncy
post Jan 22 2008, 03:07 PM
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Hello roadhog96,

This might help, the guitar is made on the rule of eighteen,
a mathematical progression formula. The values for fret placement
is applied to the fingerboard in a parallel geometry. While this
method yields a useable instrument, it fails in accurate tuning.

The Peterson Tuning machines are showing you the error of this placement( and they are excellent at it ). The failure is in your instrument, your tuning experiments have shown you how much.

The sweetened tunings Peterson lists are a method of adjustments
to make your guitar to sound better, or more pleasing to the ear, they
offer this to help you with your tuning.

The twelve tone equal temperament scale is the standard tuning used in western music , it is disliked by some, but it allows playing in many keys.

The intonation you can set are, open string tuning at pitch, fretting at the octave at pitch , using adjustments at the bridge. The higher register notes beyond the "12 th" fret are as much as 26 cents sharp to the extreme. It is possible for anyone to check their guitar note accuracy using their Peterson tuners.

How to do this ?

Well it is simple, tune open string to pitch, then adjust the bridge at the 12 th fret to pitch if you can, now write down each note at each fret, you will soon see how much your guitar is off at each fret position, try this! I challenge anyone to this simple test of failure of your instrument.

I hope you realize that you have been doing a quality review of good tuning, you are better than your instruments.

Gary
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